Occupation Outlook

Which occupation groups are projected to have the most new jobs over the next five years?

Employment is projected to increase in all eight occupation groups over the five years to May 2022.

The largest number of new jobs is projected to be for Professionals (up by 344,400 or 12.1%), with Health Professionals projected to contribute 129,800 of this increase. Large numbers of Professionals are employed in three of the four industries which are projected to have the strongest employment growth (see Industry Outlook).

Community and Personal Service Workers are projected to contribute more than a quarter of all new jobs (up by 242,900), more than half of which will be for Carers and Aides (138,500).

Growth in Community and Personal Service Workers employment is likely to provide opportunities for young people (with those aged 15 to 24 years accounting for 24% of these workers).

Projected employment growth, occupation share (% of new jobs)*

Pie chart shows the share of the projected jobs growth over the five years to May 2022 by occupation group. Professionals 36%. Community and Personal Service Workers 26%. Managers 13%. Technicians and Trades Workers 9%. Labourers 7%. Sales Workers 4%. Machinery Operators and Drivers 3%. Clerical and Administrative Workers 2%.

The chart below provides more disaggregated information about where the new jobs are projected to be and highlights the diversity of the new opportunities.

Largest projected employment gains by occupation subgroup ('000)

Bar chart shows the largest projected employment gains by occupation subgroup. Carers and Aides up by 138,500. Health Professionals 129,800. Specialist Managers 89,000. Business, Human Resource and Marketing Professionals 58,800. Education Professionals 52,700. Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 45,900. Design, Engineering, Science and Transport Professionals 42,100. Sports and Personal Service Workers 39,100. Sales Assistants 34,800. and Salespersons Hospitality Workers 32,800.

The ten occupations which are projected to add the largest numbers of new jobs over the five years to May 2022 are

  • Aged and Disabled Carers (up by 77,400)
  • Registered Nurses (65,300)
  • Child Carers (25,800)
  • General Sales Assistants (24,900)
  • General Clerks (22,200)
  • Education Aides (21,900)
  • Truck Drivers (16,200)
  • Software and Applications Programmers (15,100)
  • Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers (14,800)
  • General Practitioners and Resident Medical Officers (14,500).

Growth in these occupations will provide opportunities for young people aged 15 to 24 years, particularly the new jobs projected for General Sales Assistants, with this occupation currently providing the largest number of jobs for young people.

Which occupations will decline over the next five years?

None of the broad occupation groups are projected to record a decrease in employment over the five years to May 2022, and just seven occupation subgroups are projected to record employment falls.

Projected employment falls by subgroup ('000)

Bar chart shows the occupation subgroups projected to have employment falls over the five years to May 2022. Farmers and Farm Managers down by 15,800. Personal Assistants and Secretaries 13,600. Numerical Clerks 12,000. Automotive and Engineering Trades Workers 8,000. Machine and Stationary Plant Operators 3,700. Factory Process Workers 1,700. Sales Support Workers 900.

Are post-school qualifications required to work in a growing occupation?

The large majority of jobs growth projected over the five years to May 2022 are in the more highly skilled occupation groups (Managers, Professionals, Technicians and Trades Workers and Community and Personal Service Workers). Jobs in these groups often require post-school qualifications attained through Vocational Educational and Training or higher education.

Post-school qualifications are generally beneficial in terms of getting a job, although there will continue to be opportunities for those who have not completed post-school study.

Sources: Department of Jobs and Small Business, Occupation Employment Projections; ABS, Labour Force (annual averages of original data); ABS, Census of Population and Housing

For more information see lmip.gov.au